My research combines models, natural history and empirical data to investigate ecological and evolutionary processes that shape the structure and dynamics of mutualistic assemblages. I have a particular interest on the roles of rapid evolution as a driver of contemporary biodiversity dynamics.

INDIVIDUAL-LEVEL INTERACTIONS, ADAPTIVE DIVERSIFICATION, AND NETWORK PATTERNS
I use individual-based models to understand how biotic interactions taking place at the individual level scale up to shape the architectural patterns observed in ecological networks described at the population/species levels.

ADAPTIVE ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS

Organisms are involved in various types of ecological interactions that impose diverse and often conflicting selective pressures on phenotypic traits. Ecological interactions, therefore, shape rapid phenotypic evolution and diversification, which in turn feedback with interaction patterns and ecological dynamics. I combine empirical data and modeling to gain insight into the reciprocal effects between ecology and rapid evolution as drivers of network structure.

In addition, I use adaptive network models to investigate how anthropogenic changes in ecological interactions, such as those imposed by the addition and deletion of species, change the stability of ecological communities.